KEY DATES

Overview

The Province of BC has provided Nikkei Seniors Health Care and Housing Society (Nikkei Seniors) with $2 million as part of their commitment to honour seniors who lived through the traumatic uprooting and displacement of almost 22,000 Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. The Province of BC is acknowledging the role they played in the historical wrongs committed against the Japanese Canadian community during the period between 1942 and April 1, 1949. The grant came out of the efforts of the National Association of Japanese Canadians’ (NAJC) BC Redress initiative.

Purpose

Nikkei Seniors has designated the $2 million for the Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund (Fund). The purpose of the Fund is to provide grants to enhance programs, activities, and services that will directly benefit the health and/or wellness of these living survivors. The Fund will offer three categories of grants: Organizations, Small Groups, and Underserved.

Glossary of Terms

A range of reduced mental or physical functioning, or reduced health in older individuals
(This would include seniors with reduced ability to cope independently and/or seniors with limited resources and supports who require assistance with activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. This might include bathing, dressing, feeding, toileting, managing medication, requiring assistive equipment, requiring help with household chores, driving, shopping, etc.)

A person’s mental or physical condition

Japanese Canadian

This is a larger, not-for-profit organization that has an established constitution and bylaws and is serving survivors

A small or informal group that has been operating for at least two years and is serving survivors

A living person of Japanese descent who was directly impacted (uprooted and displaced) by the BC Government actions between 1942 and April 1, 1949 and is living in Canada. This includes impacted seniors who were not displaced but were living in BC and seniors whose families left BC but were born during this period of time.

 

A survivor provided with inadequate service. This could refer to a survivor living under any one of the following conditions:

  • is frail
  • is facing financial hardship
  • is lacking connections or is no longer able to be involved with organizations or small groups
  • is living in a geographical area that is remote
  • is living in a geographical area that has very few survivors

State of being healthy

General Information – Zoom Session

Watch this General Information Zoom session which explains and repeats the Grant Information.

Application Assistance for Organizations and Small Groups – Zoom Session

Watch this Zoom session on Application Assistance for Organizations and Small Groups. In the session, there is an explanation of the Resources that you can access on the website to help you with your application. Helpful hints as to how to prepare the application and a demonstration of the online application process are shown.

Application Assistance for Underserved Individuals – Zoom Session

Watch this Zoom session on Application Assistance for Underserved Individuals. In the session, there is an explanation of the Resources that you can access on the website to help you with your application. Helpful hints as to how to prepare the application and a demonstration of the online application process are shown.

Applicant Eligibility

Eligible Applicants

Organization –

Any JC organization with JC survivors and/or an organization that has JC-related health and/or wellness activities serving JC survivors but is not a JC organization.

Small Group –

Any small or informal group serving JC survivors with health and/or wellness activities.

Underserved –

An underserved JC survivor who will not directly benefit from another Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund grant application.

Criteria

Number of Grants

Combining Grant Applications

Maximum Awards Per Grant

Other Criteria and Information

PREFERENCES

INELIGIBLE PROJECTS

Sample Forms

Online applications will be available September 1, 2021
with a deadline of October 31, 2021

Sample Application Forms

We are providing sample drafts of application forms so that you can get an idea of what will be asked on the online application on our website jcwellness.org. The online applications will be available September 1, 2021 with a deadline of October 31, 2021. Organization and Small Group applications must be completed online.
 
Please note that the Underserved category may apply either online at jcwellness.org or may submit a paper copy. 
 

Click below for a PDF sample of the Organization and Small Group application.

Survivor Endorsement

For the Organization and Small Group applications, one Survivor Endorsement is required. Click below for a PDF of the Survivor Endorsement form. This needs to be completed and uploaded with your application.

Underserved Individual Application

Underserved Individuals have the option of an online submission or submitting their application by mail. As we have to either scan or data enter the mail in applications, the online method is preferred. Please mail to:

Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund
c/o Nikkei Seniors
100-6680 Southoaks Crescent
Burnaby, B.C.   V5E 4N3

Photo credit: Susanne Tabata

Welcome community members,

Whether you experienced the internment era first hand, or are a spouse, family member or caregiver of a Japanese Canadian who lived through the uprooting, interment, dispossession and dispersal, from 1942-1949, this page is for you.


The Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund is the result of an initial BC Government grant, as part of the ongoing BC Redress process, toward the health and wellness of Japanese Canadian seniors who experienced the internment.


Through our initial community outreach, and thanks to the research of Takashi Ohki, we have identified a clear need for support for many community members, and especially those who are not currently served by existing community organizations.

Our goal with these funds is to serve as many seniors in our community as possible, and we understand that $750 is insufficient for the unmet health and wellness needs of many. But we see this as a beginning, and encourage you to apply.


We are happy to provide assistance for you and/or your representative with the application process. Please contact our Project Office at 250-797-6300 or email eikoeby@nikkeishc.com for assistance. You may choose to fill your application in online at jcwellness.org or complete a paper copy which is attached.


We are grateful to be able to support your health and wellness, and thank you for your interest.


Sincerely,

Eiko Eby

Project Manager, Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund

Click below for PDFs of the Grant Information for Underserved Individuals and the Underserved Application.

Here are the translated versions of these documents in Japanese.

Please note that applications must be completed in English. Japanese translation provided by volunteers Chihiro Otsuka, Mami Ubukata and Masayuki Watanabe of “Lingo Gumi” of the BC Japanese Translators Group, and JCSHWF Project Assistant Mari Mikuni.

The grants to all individual recipients are non-taxable as “injury replacement payment” funds for Japanese Canadian seniors that were interned, displaced and faced financial hardship. However, any tax advice should be received by your tax professional or CRA.

Organizations and small groups who provide or can provide health and/or wellness activities, programs, and services to Japanese Canadian survivors are eligible to apply. In addition, there is an underserved category for those individual survivors who meet any of the conditions of the underserved category.
Ensure your project has a direct impact on survivors. This could include, but is NOT limited to, projects, events, products, services, supports, or unique ideas that do not fall into these categories. Examples might include: outreach to frail and isolated survivors; self-care; dementia friendly workshops; peer to peer support; reconnecting events; survivor-friendly technology connections; equipment upgrades for seniors’ group activities; reflective storytelling; wellness clinics; health & resilience workshops, supports to live independently, supports for frail individuals.

Yes, if you are an organization, you can apply for up to two grants. If an organization combines with other organizations, it is still considered one of their two. Small groups and the underserved may apply for one grant only.

No, one project is one application, but you will need to list the other organizations on the application.
Sub-groups within an organization will apply under the organization category. Small groups are informal groups that stand alone such as a small group in a bowling league.
Although the deadline for project completion is December 2022, there is flexibility around this date.

You can choose to apply for projects considering the pandemic or assume things are back to normal. The Fund will be flexible in terms of delays due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Yes. Your project must directly benefit the health and/or wellness of survivors but it may have benefits to others as well.

Yes. If a survivor is active in many programs, groups, and organizations, several applications could be including them in their survivor demographic. However, if the survivor is directly benefitting from another Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund grant application, then they cannot apply in the underserved category.

Yes. Projects that directly benefit a larger number of survivors show the committee that the impact of the project is greater.
Yes, but again projects that directly benefit a larger number of survivors show the committee that the impact of the project is greater.

If you are completing the Survivor Endorsement for your small group or organization, or if you are applying in the underserved category, you will be asked to explain how you are a survivor. You will be asked to indicate where you lived in BC and/or where were you uprooted to during the internment period. But you do not need to prove or describe the impact.

Yes. If you meet any of the conditions of the underserved category, you may apply for an underserved grant for supports to live safely.

Yes. Our Project Office is available to help if you have questions. We will offer some General Information Sessions on Zoom. And if you, your small group, or your organization needs further assistance, that can be arranged via Zoom, email, or phone. Please note that the Project Office assistance does not guarantee that an application will be successful. The underserved may have a representative to inquire on their behalf and assist them in completing their application e.g. family member, friend, etc.

You will be notified whether you are successful or unsuccessful in your application. We are anticipating that these Notification Letters will go out by December 31, 2021.
Once the Notification Letters go out, you will get the entire amount which was approved, upon accepting the terms of your Notification Letter.
For organizations and small groups, you must submit the one-page Summary Report that is provided with your Notification Letter. This must be submitted within two months of your project completion. Photos are optional should the seniors and survivors wish to share them on the Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund website at jcwellness.org. Please follow your organization’s protocol for consent to share these photos.

Please go to the Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund website at jcwellness.org. The Grant Information is located on the website, but you can also enter a question under the Contact Us tab. Or you can contact the Project Office by phone 250-797-6300 or by email eikoeby@nikkeishc.com.

The Japanese Canadian Survivors Health & Wellness Fund asks that you contact the National Association of Japanese Canadians for information. Visit bcredress.ca.

Selection Committee

Nikkei Seniors is pleased to announce that Art Miki and Susan Matsumoto have been added to the Japanese Canadian Survivors Health and Wellness Fund Grants Selection Committee of Ruth Coles, Cathy Makihara and Eiko Eby.  Both Art Miki and Susan Matsumoto are well-respected community members with extensive national experience in their professional work, and in community service. This committee will review and approve the grant applications.

Chair, Eiko Eby, JCSHWF Project Manager

Eiko Eby is a Nikkei Yonsei whose parents were both directly impacted by the BC Government actions by being displaced during the internment of Japanese Canadians in British Columbia. Eiko was on the Board of the Central Vancouver Island Japanese Canadian Cultural Society from 1987 until 2021, serving as President for the past 19 years. She has worked on numerous committees for the National Association of Japanese Canadians (NAJC) and was a member of the National Executive Board of the NAJC for four years 2016-2020. In these roles, she has contributed to the groundwork on the NAJC BC Redress initiative. Eiko also served as a member of the Community Council of the University of Victoria-led Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective. Eiko is a retiring professor in the Kinesiology Department at Vancouver Island University. In 2018, Eiko received the Vancouver Island University President’s Award for Outstanding Community Engagement for her work in the Japanese Canadian community.

Cathy Makihara, JCSHWF Steering Committee Chair

Cathy Makihara has served the seniors of the Japanese Canadian community for 30 years. Since attending Simon Fraser University, she has dedicated her work to serving her community.  Cathy has played an instrumental role in the development of Nikkei Place, a multipurpose complex in Burnaby, BC. As the former Executive Director of the Nikkei Seniors Health Care and Housing Society, she helped to create one of the first publicly funded assisted living complex in 2002 and opened the Japanese Canadian community’s independent seniors housing; and operated programs and housing for seniors in need.  In 2017, the Society was a driving force to develop Lively-Lively, a dementia-friendly day program that has expanded to several locations. Her introduction to the Japanese Canadian community began working as a field worker for the Japanese Canadian Redress Settlement where she developed a passion for working on community issues and needs.

Ruth Coles, Nikkei Seniors Board President

Ruth Coles is currently the Board President of the Nikkei Seniors Health Care and Housing Society (NSHCHS). For over 35 years, she has been active with the NSHCHS as Vice President of the Board and President since 2010. She was educated at UBC and the University of Toronto where she received her Master of Social Work degree. Ruth worked in the healthcare field for over 30 years as a social worker in management and leadership roles in Diversity Services. She advocates for caring and compassionate care, barrier free services and community building. Ruth’s commitment to volunteerism and helping the Japanese Canadian community stems from her family’s Christian values, the assistance her father gave to Japanese Canadian families in their relocation to Grand Forks during the dispersal of the Japanese Canadians from BC coastal areas, and her choice of social work as a profession.

Dr. Arthur Miki, Japanese Canadian Community Member

Art Miki is an active leader in the Japanese Canadian community having served as president of the National Association of Japanese Canadians from 1984-1992. He led the negotiations to achieve a just Federal redress settlement for Japanese Canadians interned during the Second World War. He and his family were forcibly relocated to Manitoba sugar beet farms in 1942.

Art is past-president of the Japanese Cultural Association of Manitoba and was a Director on the Japanese Canadian Redress Foundation. He was president and founder of the Asian Heritage Society of Manitoba. He was a member of the Community Council to the Landscapes of Injustice project for seven years. Presently, he is the NAJC Representative to the Canadian Race Relations Foundation.

Art is a former teacher and principal, a Canadian Citizenship Judge and a lecturer at the University of Winnipeg.

 

For his efforts nationally, provincially and locally, he has received this country’s highest recognition, the Order of Canada, the Order of Manitoba and recently received the Order of the Rising Sun from the government of Japan. He received an Honorary Doctorate degree from University of Winnipeg.

Susan Matsumoto, Japanese Canadian Community Member

Susan Matsumoto is a Nikkei Sansei born in Toronto, Ontario, but having spent her adult years in Calgary. She has recently retired as the Director of Canadian Blood Services at a national level, after 19-1/2 years. Susan is currently the Secretary of the Calgary Japanese Community Association (CJCA) and is the Chair of the CJCA Calgary Nikkei Cultural Fund Committee. Susan’s formal involvement with the Japanese Canadian community began in 2012, as a member of the National Endowment Fund subcommittee of the National Association of Japanese Canadians (NAJC). In 2014, she was elected to the NAJC Board and served until 2018. In one of her roles as Secretary, she chaired the Community Development Fund Committee. These involvements have deepened her knowledge of the grant application process and expanded her personal connections and understanding of the Japanese Canadian community across the country. She has long believed that her ikigai – life’s purpose – is to help others.

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